The Roosevelts: An Intimate History
2014, Documentary
8.8

Documentary, History, War: THE ROOSEVELTS follows the family’s story for more than a century, from Theodore’s birth in 1858 to Eleanor’s death in 1962. Over the course of those years, Theodore would become the 26th president of the United States, and his beloved niece, Eleanor, would marry his fifth cousin, Franklin, who became the 32nd president. Together, they redefined the relationship Americans had with their government and with each other, and redefined, as well, the role of the United States within the wider world. The series encompasses all the history the Roosevelts helped to make — the creation of National Parks and the digging of the Panama Canal, the New Deal and the defeat of Hitler, and the postwar struggles for civil rights at home and human rights around the world in which Eleanor Roosevelt played a central role. But it is also an intimate human story about love and betrayal, family feeling and personal courage and the conquest of fear.

Nuit et brouillard
1955, Documentary
8.6

Documentary, History, War: One of the most vivid depictions of the horrors of Nazi Concentration Camps. Filmed in 1955 at several concentration camps in Poland, the film combines new color and black and white footage with black and white newsreels, footage shot by the victorious allies, and stills, to tell the story not only of the camps, but to portray the horror of man's brutal inhumanity.

For Sama
2019, Documentary
8.5

Society, War: FOR SAMA is an intimate feature documentary that takes the form of a letter from Waad al-Kateab, a 26-year-old Syrian mother, to her daughter Sama recorded in the last days of the battle for Aleppo, Syria. Waad lives with Sama’s father, a doctor in the last surviving hospital in rebel-held Aleppo. Surrounded on all sides, bombarded daily by the Syrian regime and Russian air force, Waad fears they may be killed at any moment. So she crafts a filmed message to her one-year old daughter to explain who her parents were, what they were fighting for and why Sama came into this world – a record for the young girl in case they don’t survive. Waad’s story begins in 2012 when she was a student studying marketing at Aleppo University. Protests against the brutal dictatorship of Bashar al-Assad reach the university and Waad is one of the first to join. Her camera captures the joy and optimism of those early days. She meets a young medic in the protests called Hamza and with a group of friends they continue to demand freedom even as the regime resorts to greater and greater violence to crush them, eventually engulfing the city in full-blown war. They lose friends and narrowly escape death themselves at the hand of snipers, airstrikes and barrel bombs, scenes all captured on camera. Then, in the midst of the storm, Hamza proposes marriage. They marry, move into their first home and before long Waad is pregnant, scenes recognisable to any young couple anywhere in the world. The difference is their honeymoon plays out against an increasingly apocalyptic war. When the Russians intervene to save the regime in September 2015, they unleash ferocious violence against the rebels. Yet despite their fear, Waad and Hamza decide not to flee the city as so many have done, but to stay and continue the fight for freedom. She realises that the struggle is no longer only for them, it’s for the future of her daughter. Sama is born on the 1st January 2016, a small ray of hope in the chaos. Sama’s first year of life will see the last year of the battle for the city, a time of almost unimaginable darkness. The regime and its allies resort to every imaginable atrocity to crush the rebels. Hamza’s hospital is bombed. They are besieged and witness attacks by chlorine gas, cluster and barrel bombs, massacres of women and children. Yet amid it all, Waad and Hamza have the joy of parenthood, witnessing the first weeks of their baby daughter’s life, full of fun and laughter. She gives them the strength to endure and inspiration to all of the last band of rebels. Eventually, they are overwhelmed and forced into exile. In the exodus, the family pack their things and with tears in their eyes, bid farewell to the shattered city, the place where their dream of freedom was born and where it died. Yet they carry their daughter with them, an eternal symbol of the love and hope that the violence of tyrants cannot destroy.

They Shall Not Grow Old
2018, Documentary
8.3

Documentary, History, War: Heroism. Horror. World War I’s brutal trenches and terrible new technologies buried romantic notions of combat forever.

Zeitgeist: Addendum
2008, Documentary
8.3

Documentary, History, War: Zeitgeist: Addendum attempts to locate the root causes of the pervasive social corruption, while also offering a solution.

Manufacturing Consent: Noam Chomsky and the Media
1992, Documentary
8.2

Documentary, War: Funny, provocative, and surprisingly accessible, MANUFACTURING CONSENT explores the political life and ideas of Noam Chomsky, world-renowned linguist, intellectual and political activist. In a dynamic collage of new and original footage, biography, archival gems, imaginative graphics and outrageous illustrations, the film highlights the evolution of Chomsky’s philosophy, his probing analysis of mass media, and his critique of the forces behind the daily news. MANUFACTURING CONSENT stands as the definitive work on Chomsky, favoring a documentary style that encourages viewers to question its own workings, as Chomsky himself encourages his listeners to extricate themselves from the media's “web of deceit” by undertaking a course of “intellectual self-defense.” Winner of 22 international awards and honors including the Gold Sesterce (Nyon), Gold Apple (Oakland), Gold Hugo (Chicago), Gold Conch (Bombay); three Audience Choice awards, and the “Most Loved By Public” rating at the Sydney International Film Festival.

The Weight of Chains
2010, Documentary
8.2

Documentary, History, War: More than a decade after the turbulent disintegration of the Yugoslavian Republic, its former citizens are beginning to question not only the reasons behind the bloody conflicts of the 1990s, but also the true motives behind US and NATO intervention during the civil wars. Seeing an opportunity in the death of Yugoslavian political hero Josip Tito in 1980, the US embarked upon a sustained program of ‘predatory capitalism’ in the region. By first bankrupting the country, and then inciting its composite republics to declare independence in exchange for wads of US cash, the fervent nationalism and ethnic cleansing that ensued were inevitable. However, in the years leading up to the 1990, such inter-ethnic hatred was almost unheard of. In previously unseen footage, Serbian and Muslim neighbours who lived alongside each other harmoniously for years are forced to part ways as new US-implemented divisions of Bosnia take effect. Indeed, the sustained dismantling of Yugoslavian society in conjunction with the destruction of its infrastructure ensured that, when peace was finally declared in 1999, American and NATO forces were able to implement economic and ideological colonialism under the guise of valiant human rights intervention.

No End In Sight
2007, Documentary
8.2

Documentary, War: The first film of its kind to chronicle the reasons behind Iraq's descent into anarchy, NO END IN SIGHT is a lucid, jaw-dropping, insider's tale of wholesale incompetence, recklessness and venality. Based on over 200 hours of footage, the film provides a candid retelling of the events following the fall of Baghdad in 2003 by high ranking officials such as former Deputy Secretary of State Richard Armitage, Ambassador Barbara Bodine (in charge of Baghdad during the Spring of 2003), Colonel Lawrence Wilkerson, former Chief of Staff to Colin Powell, and General Jay Garner (in charge of the occupation of Iraq through May 2003), as well as Iraqi civilians, American soldiers and prominent analysts. NO END IN SIGHT examines the manner in which the principal errors of U.S. policy largely created the insurgency and chaos that engulf Iraq today.

Virunga
2014, Documentary
8.2

Documentary, War: Rebels. Poachers. Oil companies. The endangered mountain gorilla has many enemies, and one friend: local park rangers.

Hearts and Minds
1974, Documentary
8.2

Documentary, History, War: A startling and courageous film, Peter Davis’s landmark 1974 documentary Hearts and Minds unflinchingly confronted the United States’ involvement in Vietnam at the height of the controversy that surrounded it. Using a wealth of sources—from interviews to newsreels to footage of the conflict and the upheaval it occasioned on the home front—Davis constructs a powerfully affecting picture of the disastrous effects of war. Explosive, persuasive, and wrenching, Hearts and Minds is an overwhelming emotional experience and the most important nonfiction film ever made about this devastating period in history.

The Fog of War: Eleven Lessons from the Life of Robert S. McNamara
2003, Documentary
8.1

Biography, Documentary, History: Academy Award®-winner for Best Documentary Feature, THE FOG OF WAR is the story of America as seen through the eyes of the former Secretary of Defense, under President Kennedy and President Johnson, Robert S. McNamara. McNamara was one of the most controversial and influential political figures of the 20th century. Now - for the first time ever - he sits down one on one with award-winning director Errol Morris (The Thin Blue Line) to offer a candid and intimate journey through some of the most seminal events in contemporary American history. As leader of the world's most powerful military force during this nation's most volatile period in recent years, McNamara offers new and often surprising insights into the 1945 bombing of Tokyo, the Cuban Missile Crisis, and the effects of the Vietnam War. Featuring newly released Oval Office recorded conversations with Presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson, THE FOG OF WAR received critical acclaim for its up-close and personal insider perspective. See the film that Roger Ebert (Chicago Sun-Times) hailed as "a masterpiece!"

The Soviet Story
2008, Documentary
8.1

Documentary, History, War: The film tells the story of the Soviet regime and how the Soviet Union helped Nazi Germany instigate the Holocaust. The film shows recently uncovered archive documents revealing this. Interviews with former Soviet intelligence officers reveal shocking details on: The Great Famine in Ukraine (1923/33); the Katyn massacre (1940); the SS-KGB partnership; Soviet mass deportations; and medical experiments in the GULAG. These are just some of the topics covered by this first time documentary film by director Edvins Snore. Based on 10 years of research The Soviet Story was filmed over 2 years in Russia, Ukraine, Latvia, Germany, France, the UK and Belgium. As a result, The Soviet Story presents a truly unique insight into recent Soviet history, told by people once Soviet citizens, who had first hand knowledge of it. The Soviet Story also discusses the impact of the Soviet legacy on modern day Europe. The Soviet Story is a story of pain, injustice and "realpolitik".

Lessons of Darkness
1992, Documentary
8.0

Documentary, War

Night Will Fall
2014, Documentary
8.0

Documentary, History, War: When Allied forces liberated the Nazi concentration camps, their terrible discoveries were recorded by army cameramen, revealing for the first time the horror of what had happened. Using British, Soviet, and American footage, the Ministry of Information's Sidney Bernstein collaborated with Alfred Hitchcock to make a film that would provide evidence of the Nazi's unspeakable crimes. Yet, despite initial support from the British and US governments, the film was shelved. In this compelling documentary by André Singer (executive producer, The Act of Killing), the full story of the filming of the camps, and the fate of Bernstein's project, can finally be told.

Why We Fight
2005, Documentary
8.0

Documentary, Drama, History: Winner of the Grand Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival, WHY WE FIGHT takes an unflinching look at the anatomy of American war-making. With unparalleled Pentagon access, the film launches a non partisan inquiry into the forces - political, economic, and ideological - that drive the United States of America to fight. Inspired by President Dwight Eisenhowers 1961 Farewell Address in which he warned Americans about the dangers of the ""military-industrial complex"", filmmaker Eugene Jarecki (THE TRIALS OF HENRY KISSINGER) weaves unforgettable stories of everyday citizens touched by war, with commentary by a whos who of military and Washington insiders. Featuring Senator John McCain, Gore Vidal, Richard Perle and many others, WHY WE FIGHT explores a half century of U.S. foreign policy from World War II to the Iraq War, revealing how, as Eisenhower warned, political and corporate interests have become alarmingly entangled in the business of war. On a deeper level, what emerges in this award-winning film is a portrait of a nation in transition - drifting dangerously far from her founding principles towards a more imperial and uncertain future.

Little Dieter Needs to Fly
1997, Documentary
8.0

Documentary, Drama, War

Breaker Morant
1980, Documentary
7.8

Drama, History, War: Three Australian lieutenants are court martialed for executing prisoners as a way of deflecting attention from war crimes committed by their superior officers.

The Tillman Story
2010, Documentary
7.7

Biography, Documentary, Mystery: Chronicles the life of the late Pat Tillman, who walked away from a multimillion-dollar contract with the NFL's Arizona Cardinals in 2002 to join the Army but died from friendly fire in Afghanistan.

Religulous
2008, Documentary
7.6

Comedy, Documentary, War: In this new comedy from director Larry Charles (BORAT, "Seinfeld"), comedian and TV host Bill Maher ("Real Time with Bill Maher," "Politically Incorrect") takes a pilgrimage across the globe on a mind-opening journey into the ultimate taboo: questioning religion. Meeting the high and low from different religions, Maher simply asks questions, like "Why is faith good?" "Why doesn't an all-powerful God speak to us directly?" and "How can otherwise rational people believe in a talking snake?" For anyone who's even a little spiritually curious, this divine entertainment will deepen your faith...in comedy!

Last Days in Vietnam
2014, Documentary
7.6

Documentary, History, War: During the final days of the Vietnam War, North Vietnamese forces closed in on Saigon as South Vietnamese resistance crumbled. An unlikely group of heroes emerged as Americans and South Vietnamese took matters into their own hands.

The Gatekeepers
2012, Documentary
7.6

Documentary, History, War: Charged with overseeing Israel’s war on terror-both Palestinian and Jewish- the head of the Shin Bet, Israel’s Secret Service is present at the crossroads of every decision made. For the first time ever six former heads of the agency agreed to share their insights and reflect publicly on their actions and decisions. The Gatekeepers offers an exclusive account of the sum of their successes and failures. It validates the reasons that each man individually and the six as a group came to reconsider their hard-line positions and advocate a conciliatory approach toward their enemies based on a two-state solution.

Fahrenheit 9/11
2004, Documentary
7.5

Documentary, Drama, War: In the most provocative film of the year, Academy Award(r)-winner Michael Moore (2002, Best Documentary, Bowling for Columbine) presents a searing examination of the role played by money and oil in thewake of the tragic events of 9/11. Moore blends captivating and thought-provoking footage with revealing interviews, while balancing it all with his own brand of humor and satire.

Dirty Wars
2013, Documentary
7.5

Crime, Documentary, Drama: Investigative reporter Jeremy Scahill stumbles upon a U.S. night raid gone badly wrong in a remote corner of Afghanistan. An Afghani witness swears he saw American soldiers digging bullets out of the dead women and Scahill's investigation leads him to the secret maneuvers of the shadowy and powerful Joint Special Operations Command (JSOC). Our reporter is pulled into a world of covert operations unknown to the public and carried out across the globe by men who do not exist on paper and will never appear before Congress. In military jargon, JSOC teams "find, fix, and finish" their targets, who are selected through a secret process. No target is off limits for Obama's "kill list," including U.S. citizens. From Afghanistan to Yemen and Somalia, as well as back home in New York where he tries to piece the puzzle together, Scahill meets with CIA agents, Special Forces operators, military generals and U.S.-backed warlords who go on camera and on the record-some for the first time. He tracks down the survivors of night raids and drone strikes, including the family of the first American citizen marked for death and being hunted by his own government. With a strong cinematic style and thriller structure, Dirty Wars takes viewers to remote corners of the globe to see first-hand wars fought in their name and offers a behind-the-scenes look at a high-stakes investigation. Dirty Wars is also a book by Jeremy Scahill on the same topic, exhaustively researched and footnoted and available on request.

Restrepo
2010, Documentary
7.5

Documentary, War: Restrepo is a feature-length documentary that chronicles the deployment of a platoon of U.S. soldiers in Afghanistan's Korengal Valley. The movie focuses on a remote 15-man outpost, "Restrepo," named after a platoon medic who was killed in action. It was considered one of the most dangerous postings in the U.S. military. This is an entirely experiential film: the cameras never leave the valley; there are no interviews with generals or diplomats. The only goal is to make viewers feel as if they have just been through a 90- minute deployment. This is war, full stop. The conclusions are up to you.